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Brooke Ragsdale
Sweet Graphix Design & Photography is definitely NOT your average retail design and photography company.  My name is Brooke Ragsdale and I will work with throughout the process, starting with getting to know you so I can pick up on your personality traits all the way to your intentions for your finished designs and/or photographs.  I want you to walk away from this experience feeling like you will “do” something artistic or creative with the photographs instead of tossing them into an envelope and storing them in “that” box in your attic.

I am probably one of the most laid back and comical people you will ever meet.  I am known for taking awkward situations and turning them into something so funny it’s a top 10 honorable mention.  When working with me I want you to feel relaxed and walking away feeling like you had a blast. I’m a spectator for the most part.  I like to hang out on the “out-skirts” and watch my subjects interact, especially when photographing children.  I get so tickled when watching children interact with each other and when they discover something new.  Being able to capture the expression on their tiny little faces is a great way to document a monumental milestone and deserves to sit on the mantel.

Often with large groups of people like families, I have to get involved a bit more and suggest certain poses but I still like to stay in the background to photograph who you really are.  I want you to be able to look back through your photographs and see yourself and feel your personality jump off the page.

By now you should have a decent understanding of how I work and if you decide that my style isn’t what you are after, then I would be more than happy to refer you to a few other local companies that offer a different experience.  My mission for my photography business is not about creating art for myself but for you, my client.  I want to create things that YOU will appreciate and want hanging in your home for many, many years.  I’m all about dirty faces, bare feet splashing in puddles, crocs, scuffed knees.  These are real life things and moments and those are what I love to capture for you.  That being said, I love taking my photos a bit further and performing artistic edits on them.  For examples of that, please look through the retouching photo folder.

I want to be remembered for "Creating your life in Art."

Please contact me today about booking your session and capturing this time in your family’s life together at photog@sweetgraphixphotography.com.
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Thursday, May 9, 2013

Once your art and memorabilia has been framed, it needs to be displayed. Although it is popular today to lean pictures here and there, the most common home for frames is still on the wall. The two main things to focus on will be visual placement and making sure they are hung securely, for you safety as well as the safety of the framing itself and anything it might damage if it falls.

It is important to hang frames securely, using appropriate supplies and techniques. There are different methods you can use depending on the application. Read on for specific examples.

To Hold Heavy Mirrors

Avoid the use of picture wire. Hang directly from strap hangers (a loop over a flat plate that screws into the frame). Rather than traditional wall hooks, use wall anchors such as Molly Bolts, that go through the sheet rock and lock into it.

To Prevent Theft

Security Hangers are available that firmly hold all sides of the frame in place on the wall. A special key tool is needed to lock it and again to unlock it. These are generally used in public places but are also good where the frame may easily be bumped.

To Protect Kids

In a kid’s room where things are thrown around, use Security Hangers. If you don’t have access to them, try strap hangers on each side of the frame and heavy duty hooks in the wall for the hanger to sit into. Do not rely on just nails in the wall as they can fall out of the wall or the frame can jump off the nail if something is thrown at it.

To Avoid Crooked Frames on the Wall

When frames are hung from a single point, they usually shift on the wall over time. Both for safety and also to keep frames straight, always hang everything from two points. On heavier pieces this also helps distribute the weight.

To Keep Frames Flush to the Wall

Screw eyes that are often used to attach wire to the frame tend to make the frames lean out from the wall more than they need to. Also, excess slack in the wire can cause the top to lean out. By switching to strap hangers, you can overcome both problems. These hangers are flatter and give you the option of hanging directly from the hanger versus using wire.

Even the most beautiful pieces of framed art can still look awkward if they are not hung logically. Some of the key considerations are:

  1. Choosing framed art that fits the space where it will hang
  2. Hang frames in reasonably close proximity to the furniture below it to create unison
  3. Hang frames at eye level for maximum viewing pleasure, keeping in mind people stand in foyers and halls and sit in many other spaces so that height can vary

Single Pieces

Single pieces offer a lot of flexibility, but there are still general guidelines that will help your presentations. Typically the frame should not be longer than the furniture piece below it, although this is not a firm rule. Avoid heavy frames over dainty furniture or petite framing over massive furniture to create balance. In small spaces avoid overly dramatic art that is best viewed from a distance and in a large space choose a piece that can be seen and enjoyed from across the room.

Pairs

Pairs can be hung side by side or one over the other. Consider the wall space when making your decision. In rooms with long walls and low ceilings, hang them beside each other. In a two story room to fill some of the vertical space, hang one on top of the other. Pairs do not have to be placed immediately adjacent to one another. You can hang one piece on each side of a mirror or tall piece of furniture. Pairs can also be split to become the outermost pieces of a grouping.

Matched Sets

Matched sets of framed art are usually framed identically and hung in an organized fashion on the wall. These types of groupings often end up in a grid with perfect spacing. Stairway walls are wonderful for displaying sets. Simply shift your rows so they progress up the wall at the same angle as the stairs. You can also divide sets. For example, hang half on each side of an armoire.

Random Collections

Unlike matched sets of art, this might be something like a collection of landscape paintings, family photos, etc. In this case, frame them to suit each piece of art and hang them in a less structured way. If you may want to add to your collection, this type of arrangement makes it easier to add pieces in the future. Whether you prefer symmetry or choose an asymmetrical arrangement, it pays to create a pleasing balance of colors, sizes, styles, and textures so one side doesn’t overpower the other.

Leaning

  It has become highly fashionable to lean framed art. This can be done for functional or purely aesthetic reasons. If you are downsizing and have more framed art than wall space, you can lean one piece in front of another to consolidate your collection. Overlapping framed art adds dimension and interest, as well as bringing a new look to the art itself.

Tip

When hanging art you can get a good idea of how it will look by cutting out a piece of paper the same size as the outer edge of the frame and taping it to the wall. It is much easier to move the paper around than to change the positioning of the actual frame. On that same paper, you can make marks where you want to place your wall hooks. Then install the hooks over the paper and then tear the paper away.

Thanks,

SGDP_BrookePink-2013-05-9-15-28.png

SGDP_Blogger%25252BFooter-2013-05-9-15-28.png

All images photographed by Brooke Ragsdale on this blog, website, and/or on Facebook are copyright Sweet Graphix Design & Photography unless otherwise stated or linked to. Please do not screen-grab, right-click, or copy and post these to any website, social media site, etc. By doing so, you are violating copyright laws and will be asked to remove them immediately. Only Sweet Graphix Design & Photography may post these images online. When referencing your proofs, please link to this site unless we specifically post them on Facebook and grant permission to tag yourself. We appreciate your cooperation.

Thank you for visiting our site.

If you have any questions please feel free to email me at 423.771.6380.

Once your art and memorabilia has been framed, it needs to be displayed. Although it is popular today to lean pictures here and there, the most common home for frames is still on the wall. The two main things to focus on will be visual placement and making sure they are hung securely, for you safety as well as the safety of the framing itself and anything it might damage if it falls.

It is important to hang frames securely, using appropriate supplies and techniques. There are different methods you can use depending on the application. Read on for specific examples.

To Hold Heavy Mirrors

Avoid the use of picture wire. Hang directly from strap hangers (a loop over a flat plate that screws into the frame). Rather than traditional wall hooks, use wall anchors such as Molly Bolts, that go through the sheet rock and lock into it.

To Prevent Theft

Security Hangers are available that firmly hold all sides of the frame in place on the wall. A special key tool is needed to lock it and again to unlock it. These are generally used in public places but are also good where the frame may easily be bumped.

To Protect Kids

In a kid’s room where things are thrown around, use Security Hangers. If you don’t have access to them, try strap hangers on each side of the frame and heavy duty hooks in the wall for the hanger to sit into. Do not rely on just nails in the wall as they can fall out of the wall or the frame can jump off the nail if something is thrown at it.

To Avoid Crooked Frames on the Wall

When frames are hung from a single point, they usually shift on the wall over time. Both for safety and also to keep frames straight, always hang everything from two points. On heavier pieces this also helps distribute the weight.

To Keep Frames Flush to the Wall

Screw eyes that are often used to attach wire to the frame tend to make the frames lean out from the wall more than they need to. Also, excess slack in the wire can cause the top to lean out. By switching to strap hangers, you can overcome both problems. These hangers are flatter and give you the option of hanging directly from the hanger versus using wire.

Even the most beautiful pieces of framed art can still look awkward if they are not hung logically. Some of the key considerations are:

  1. Choosing framed art that fits the space where it will hang
  2. Hang frames in reasonably close proximity to the furniture below it to create unison
  3. Hang frames at eye level for maximum viewing pleasure, keeping in mind people stand in foyers and halls and sit in many other spaces so that height can vary

Single Pieces

Single pieces offer a lot of flexibility, but there are still general guidelines that will help your presentations. Typically the frame should not be longer than the furniture piece below it, although this is not a firm rule. Avoid heavy frames over dainty furniture or petite framing over massive furniture to create balance. In small spaces avoid overly dramatic art that is best viewed from a distance and in a large space choose a piece that can be seen and enjoyed from across the room.

Pairs

Pairs can be hung side by side or one over the other. Consider the wall space when making your decision. In rooms with long walls and low ceilings, hang them beside each other. In a two story room to fill some of the vertical space, hang one on top of the other. Pairs do not have to be placed immediately adjacent to one another. You can hang one piece on each side of a mirror or tall piece of furniture. Pairs can also be split to become the outermost pieces of a grouping.

Matched Sets

Matched sets of framed art are usually framed identically and hung in an organized fashion on the wall. These types of groupings often end up in a grid with perfect spacing. Stairway walls are wonderful for displaying sets. Simply shift your rows so they progress up the wall at the same angle as the stairs. You can also divide sets. For example, hang half on each side of an armoire.

Random Collections

Unlike matched sets of art, this might be something like a collection of landscape paintings, family photos, etc. In this case, frame them to suit each piece of art and hang them in a less structured way. If you may want to add to your collection, this type of arrangement makes it easier to add pieces in the future. Whether you prefer symmetry or choose an asymmetrical arrangement, it pays to create a pleasing balance of colors, sizes, styles, and textures so one side doesn’t overpower the other.

Leaning

  It has become highly fashionable to lean framed art. This can be done for functional or purely aesthetic reasons. If you are downsizing and have more framed art than wall space, you can lean one piece in front of another to consolidate your collection. Overlapping framed art adds dimension and interest, as well as bringing a new look to the art itself.

Tip

When hanging art you can get a good idea of how it will look by cutting out a piece of paper the same size as the outer edge of the frame and taping it to the wall. It is much easier to move the paper around than to change the positioning of the actual frame. On that same paper, you can make marks where you want to place your wall hooks. Then install the hooks over the paper and then tear the paper away.

Thanks,

SGDP_BrookePink-2013-05-9-15-28.png

SGDP_Blogger%25252BFooter-2013-05-9-15-28.png

All images photographed by Brooke Ragsdale on this blog, website, and/or on Facebook are copyright Sweet Graphix Design & Photography unless otherwise stated or linked to. Please do not screen-grab, right-click, or copy and post these to any website, social media site, etc. By doing so, you are violating copyright laws and will be asked to remove them immediately. Only Sweet Graphix Design & Photography may post these images online. When referencing your proofs, please link to this site unless we specifically post them on Facebook and grant permission to tag yourself. We appreciate your cooperation.

Thank you for visiting our site.

If you have any questions please feel free to email me at 423.771.6380.

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